The British Rowlatt Act against India national movement

British rule in India (British Raj) officially dates back to 1858. It was following the great Indian Revolt of 1857 (Revolt of the Sepoys), due in large part to the arrogant conduct of the East India Company, which until then had governed the subcontinent, which became the direct domain of the English Crown, which allowed … read more

The Egyptian uprising in 1919 and Wilson’s Fourteen Points

We often forget the tribute that the so-called persons of color gave to the Allied victory in the Great War: on almost 9 million people mobilized by Great Britain, for example, 2.7 million were non-British troops. Their blood tribute was very high: out of 910 thousand fallen, 177 thousand in fact belonged to colonial troops. … read more

Anti-Bolshevik alliances on the Baltic, 1st February 1919

Major General Rüdiger von der Goltz was certainly not a rookie, when on 1 February 1919 he arrived in Liepāja, Latvia. His last command was the Sixth Army, who had fought hard against the Bolsheviks in Finland: Now he slipped into one of the most incredible puzzles formed immediately after the collapse of the German … read more

Fear of the revolution in Britain, Glasgow 29 January 1919

Too often we are accustomed to think that social conflicts at the end of the Great War have only affected Central and Eastern Europe, and not the western democracies. What happened in Glasgow in Scotland from 29 January 1919 proves the opposite. The workers ask for the day of 40 hours More than 40 thousand … read more

The Irish revolution, a the trial of the Fourteen Points, 21 January 1919

“For these among other reasons, Ireland—resolutely and irrevocably determined at the dawn of the promised era of self-determination and liberty that she will suffer foreign dominion no longer—calls upon every free nation to uphold her national claim to complete independence as an Irish Republic against the arrogant pretensions of England founded in fraud and sustained … read more